Building Heights in Dar es Salaam

I first went to Dar es Salaam in 2011, there were a few skyscrapers adorning the city’s skyline, now they’re everywhere! Sitting on a rooftop bar in the center of the city, it’s a mass of cranes and pristine new buildings.

Alongside this rapid growth, Ramani Huria has been collecting a lot of data but a lot of it doesn’t get rendered by the default OSM styles… so I’ve dug into the data and created a map of the different floors across the city.

This interactive map allows you to explore where the tallest buildings are in the city, but in displaying the data in this way, also allows for the densest, unplanned and informal areas of the city to become very clear.

There is still some way to go though – in Dar es Salaam there are around 750,000 buildings, with roughly 220,000 (~30%) having been surveyed by the Ramani Huria team and given an appropriate attribute. Ramani Huria has focused its efforts in the urban centres of Dar es Salaam, where most of the multi-story buildings are to be found. But, still a lot more to be covered towards Bagomoyo and Morogoro.

Hat tip to Harry Wood who’s advice and guidance pointed me in the right direction – a more technical blog post and more details of other challenges around correctness of tagging but that’s for another post – now to look at Floor Spaces Indices…!

Prologue to the Sanitation Hackathon

Florian Rathgeber and Fayaz Valli at the World Bank, Washington DC.
Florian Rathgeber (right centre) and Fayaz Valli (left centre) at the World Bank, Washington DC.

Taarifa was announced in various mediums as being a winner of the sanitation hackathon. To this end two Taarifans are currently representing all Taarifans in Washington DC and San Francisco. More will come from this, I’m sure. However, all of the projects of the sanitation hackathon should be given the same pedestal and treatment.

The number of projects and energy that the sanitation hackathon generated should not be lost, and energised by the constant support and coverage;

“The event featured nearly 1000 registered hackers at ten locations worldwide who developed some 62 new prototypes.” – Sanitation Hackathon Site

While this moment is still in the here and now we should all move forward, collaborating, instead of competing. From this solve the technical challenges within the sanitation issues which we face. Undoubtedly, it is a naïve and deterministic proposition to suggest that technology will solve the world’s problems. However, events like the sanitation hackathon have demonstrated that technologists from all walks of life can work together. Building a social side to these systems is a bigger problem than the technological ones, prizes and recognition aren’t replacements and should not be considered replacements for this. The hard work starts now.

Written and submitted in the Hotel Kilimanjaro, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania (-6.81669, 39.293198)